Essay Topic Ideas – 2021

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Figuring out an essay topic can be frustrating. We’re here to help. Hi. I’m Mark with EssayPro, and in this article, we will cover the most successful essay topics for this year.

Topic #1 – A Life Changing Experience Let’s dive right in with something personal. A good essay topic would be ‘A Life-Changing Experience’ Pretty straight-forward stuff. You should think of an event you experienced that radically shifted your life. It could be anything from relocating to another city or country or an unexpected change of mindset where you learned something about yourself or others — that influenced your behavior.

Topic #2 – Your Passion Writing about a topic you’re passionate about, that you’re emotionally involved in, will feel like time just flew by. This is excellent for essay writing practice because you don’t have to do much research, since you probably already have a lot to say about your passion. Writing about your passion can get you a long way when it comes to getting good grades. It may possibly also help you decide on your career path, for the future.

Topic #3 – Relationships If you’ve ever socialized in any social circumstances, you’ve probably made a friend. Write about your closest relationships – those that have helped build your personality, made you reflect about the world, and just made you feel good being involved. You can isolate moments that had the most emotional impact and write about that.

Topic #4 – Storytelling Another great way to choose an essay topic is by storytelling. Think about a setting. It could be your favorite place. Or it could be something entirely made up. Write down the different ideas on a scrap piece of paper. Then, turn it into a narrative. It’s as simple as that. If you get good at this, it gets you a long way in academia.

Topic #5 – Compare & Contrast Another great way to write your paper is to compare and contrast. There are thousands of things to compare … and also contrast. From historic events to their causes. You can do this with literature, musical styles, geography, and many others. Whatever is your cup of tea — this way of choosing an essay topic works. For an example of this style, we took a sample from AcademicHelp to demonstrate how to start

Topic #6 – Argue Your Position If compare and contrast is not your thing, argumentative styles may be the 'golden ticket'. There is a vast amount of different topics to argue about. That could be: “Despite what the news says, the world isn’t really getting worse” or “Nuclear Power’s newest generation is more efficient and cost-effective than wind or solar.” Each topic is debatable. There are many different sides to these topics. Therefore, writing in an argumentative style is incredibly simple, and highly effective!

Topic #7 – Controversy For topic 7, we decided to take a slightly different approach. Think about the most controversial topics. Like, “Should the death penalty still be practiced?”, “Should cannabis be permitted for medical reasons?”, or “What are the most suitable legal actions against illegal immigrants?” Anyone of these topics is a guaranteed winner.

These essay topics are something to think about. There are many different writing styles which include their own unique essay topics. Click the link in the description to take a look at our blog post featuring a list of samples for every formal type of essay. Thanks for reading. Don’t forget to subscribe, like, and hit that notification bell!

About Post Author

Professor Cram

Professor Lawrence Cram is a Visiting Fellow at the Australian National University working in the Department of Applied Mathematics. His interests include astronomy, mathematics, engineering, computing, and physics. Due to his extensive expertise, professor Cram has worked as a Professor of Physics at the University of Sydney and as the Deputy Vice-Chancellor at ANU during 2004-2012. In 2013, he retired as a Master, University House and Graduate House. In January 2014, he was appointed as an acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Charles Darwin University. Professor Cram is also a Fellow at the Royal Astronomical Society and the Australian Institute of Physics.
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